Friday, June 16, 2017

118-year old painting discovered in Antarctic hut

118-year old painting discovered in Antarctic hut

June 15, 2017
An “almost perfectly preserved” watercolour painting has been discovered in an historic hut in Antarctica, dating back more than 118 years.
The painting, dated 1889, is of a ‘Tree Creeper’ bird. It was painted by scientist Dr Edward Wilson who died alongside Captain Robert Falcon Scott and three others on their return from the South Pole in 1912.
It was found at Cape Adare and was originally discovered in September last year among dust, mould and penguin excrement.
The find was kept confidential until now to allow the New Zealand Antarctic Heritage Trust to preserve more than 1500 other artefacts.
The Antarctic conditions were the perfect way to preserve the painting.
Water colour paintings are particularly susceptible to light so the fact this work has spent more than a hundred years tightly packed between other sheets of paper in completely dark and cold conditions is an ideal way to store it.
Trust general manager Francesca Eathorne says it is a poignant reminder of the legacy the early explorers left behind.
1. Who is the main person or group of people in this news article?

2. What was the key event from the news article?

3. Where did this event take place?

4. When did this event take place?
I think
I think
I think
I wonder

Sunday, June 11, 2017

School Cross Country

Sunday, 11 June 2017

School Cross Country

Guess what? Today it’s cross country day! I’m feeling proud, challenging other people and I’m also happy that people can try their best. Caleb  

I feel nervous because I get scared when people watch me running- Sophie

I feel proud because we have been training for five weeks. Maddie

I feel proud because I have been practicing for five weeks and I have been looking for this day. Cathy

I feel very proud because I have been training for 5 weeks. Micah

I feel nervous because I might not win but I hope Keiren wins too. Connor

I feel nervous because my mum is going to be there and Alaska is going to watch me. Millie

I feel nervous because I don’t want to get beaten by Curtis. I feel weird because I’m
excited but I’m not. Niall  
I feel nervous because I don’t know what place I will come. Oliver

I feel very proud because I could come first. I also feel nervous because all the parents are watching me. Daniel
I feel nervous because I might come last. Makayla

I feel nervous and happy because I am going to give it my best shot and just do my best. Katie

I feel nervous because parents are watching me as I run my three laps. Emily

I feel nervous because I feel like I’m going to get last. I feel proud because we have been training for five weeks. Casey

I feel nervous because there is a big crowd. I feel nervous that Ben might beat me. Curtis


I feel nervous because I might come last. Sophia


I feel glad because it is finally over because it was tiring doing the training. Nico

I feel nervous because all the people are staring at me. Tayla

 


  

Friday, June 09, 2017

Pupu Springs

Golden Bay springs gets water protection order

June 7, 2017
Te Waikoropupu Springs are located in Golden Bay, near Nelson. They are a hot spot for tourists, and are thought to be some of the cleanest and clearest water in New Zealand.
The Springs will have the highest possible protection for a water body – a Water Conservation Order (WCO).
The Government says WCOs are the equivalent of National Park status for a water body.
There are currently 15 WCOs in New Zealand – 13 rivers and two lakes. This is the first application for a springs.
It’s a long time coming for local iwi Ngati Tama, who have been fighting to get protection for the pristine water system, and consider the springs wahi tapu, a sacred place.
Environment Minister, Nick Smith said “These springs are part of what gives Golden Bay, Nelson and New Zealand a strong environmental reputation, and we must ensure they are protected for future generations.”
1. Who is the main person or group of people in this news article?

2. What was the key event from the news article?

3. Where did this event take place?

4. When did this event take place?

I think
I think
I think
I wonder

Tuesday, June 06, 2017

Oamaru Penguins

Oamaru builds tunnel to help penguins

November 24, 2016
Oamaru has built a 25 metre tunnel to help their local penguins pass the busy road between the sea and their nests.
Penguins in the town are rare ‘blue’ penguins, the smallest kind in the world, and are an endangered species.
Before the underpass, the birds crossed the road protected only by a “penguin crossing” sign.
The underpass was started in September this year, and was opener earlier this month.
Oamaru’s blue penguin colony is one of the few populations in the world that is actually growing.

1. Who is the main person or group of people in this news article?

2. What was the key event from the news article?
They have built a 25 metre underpass for the penguins to get from the sea to their nests without crossing road.
3. Where did this event take place?
Oamaru- NZ
4. When did this event take place?
September 2016.
My opinion-
I think now that there is a underpass the penguins will have more of a chance traveling from the sea to their nest so they can increase the population- Caleb
I think the penguins were interested in the tunnel because they looked around.- Connor
I think  it was better having the tunnel than having to get run over- Emily
I wonder how long it took the penguins to find the tunnel ?- Niall

Friday, June 02, 2017

learning about insulation

We have been learning about insulation.  We learnt that blubber or fat keeps animals warm, especially animals that live in the sea.  Some whales have blubber that is over 30 cm thick!  Some animals have two layers of fur that keep them warm in the winter like the moose.
We did an experiment that showed that fat keeps us warm.  We used fat and put it on one hand and kept the other hand free.  We put both hands into icy cold water.  The hand with the fat on was heaps warmer than the hand without the fat on it.
Fat is an insulator.

Check out our photos!




Thursday, May 25, 2017

current events week 5 Turtle Recovery at Kelly Tarlton

Turtle washes up on 90 mile beac

May 23, 2017
A critically endangered hawksbill turtle is being nursed back to health after being found washed up on Northland’s 90 Mile Beach earlier this month.
It was exhausted, dehydrated, not eating and missing a flipper. While the cause of the amputated flipper was not known, it appeared to be an older wound that had healed well.
Auckland Zoo provided initial urgent medical attention before the turtle was taken to the Kelly Tarlton’s Sea Life rehabilitation centre.
Auckland Zoo resident vet Lydia Uddstrom said the turtle had eaten at least one piece of plastic, and it was unclear how much more it might have inside it.
Plastic was an ongoing concern for marine animals, she said.
“We’re getting more and more plastic out there and we’re going to be getting more and more effects from it, and from animals that shouldn’t be eating it, eating it.”
The turtle was showing encouraging signs of improvement after its check-up today.
Once the turtle’s strength had improved, it would be moved to a larger oceanarium to exercise and go about its natural behaviour with the goal of releasing it back into the wild.
Yesterday was World Turtle Day, which aims to increase attention and public support for their survival.

Who: Hawksbill Turtle, Auckland Zoo resident vet Lydia Uddstrom,  Kelly Tarlton’s Sea Life rehabilitation centre.

Where: Northland’s 90 Mile Beach

When: Earlier this month

Why: It was found washed up on the shore. 
What happened: A critically endangered hawksbill turtle is being nursed back to health after being found washed up on Northland’s 90 Mile Beach earlier this month. It was exhausted, dehydrated, not eating and missing a flipper. The turtle had eaten at least one piece of plastic, and it was unclear how much more it might have inside it.

My opinion: 
I think it will eat more plastic- Micah.
I think it is sad that people throw plastic into the sea- Makayla
I think a fisherman cut off its flipper- Drew

I think it's good that they are making him healthier and stronger- Charlotte
I wonder how old it is? Caleb
I wonder if it will go back to the wild? Drew


Monday, May 22, 2017

Current Events

Current Events

Pacific Island covered in plastic

May 18, 2017
Scientists have discovered what they say is the worst case of plastic pollution in the world.
They found nearly 38 million items of plastic debris on Henderson Island in the South Pacific – carried there on ocean currents.
The uninhabited island, which is part of a UNESCO World Heritage site, is the largest of the four Pitcairn Islands.
Australian researcher Jennifer Lavers said the island had the highest density of plastic rubbish anywhere in the world.
The team calculated there were 671.6 items per square metre on the surface of the beaches, with approximately 68 percent of debris buried less than 10 centimetres in the sand.
Each day, 17 to 268 new items washed up on a 10-metre section of North Beach.
She said the finding was a wake-up call to the world that plastic pollution was as grave a threat to humanity as climate change.
Annual production of plastic has increased from 1.7m tonnes in 1954 to 311m tonnes in 2014.
This has resulted in an estimated five trillion plastic items – mostly less than five millimetres in size – circulating in the surface layer of the world’s oceans.
1. Who is the main person or group of people in this news article? Australian researcher Jennifer Lavers 

2. What was the key event from the news article? Scientists have discovered what they say is the worst case of plastic pollution in the world. They found nearly 38 million items of plastic debris on Henderson Island in the South Pacific – carried there on ocean currents.

3. Where did this event take place? Henderson Island in the South Pacific

4. When did this event take place? May 2017
I think
I wonder